Sunday, February 19, 2012

Birthday Sheep

Turning 40 years old isn't so bad when you're surrounded by your favorite people, especially when those favorite people happen to live on a sheep dairy and it's lambing season.

Last Wednesday was my big 4-0, so the hubby and I trekked to Hidden Springs Creamery near Westby to hang out with Dean and Brenda Jensen and their 350 sheep for the day. Brenda had hinted last fall my birthday would conveniently fall during prime lambing season, and really, who doesn't want to spend their 40th birthday in a barn surrounded by newborn bleating lambs? Hello, dream trip!

We arrived late afternoon, just in time for transporting the 11 lambs born that morning to an Amish neighbor's farm, as Brenda had run out of clean stalls (this occasionally happens when you have 275 moms giving birth to an average of twins in a 30-day period). Another 75 ewes will lamb in May, giving Brenda a longer milking season, and thus more milk to make cheese later into the season.

How do you transport newborn lambs, you ask? You pick them up from their stalls, carry them to the farm pick-up, carefully place them in tubs in the cab, and carry the extras on your lap. It's amazing how warm, snuggly and quiet a newborn lamb is - I think the one I was holding in my lap for the 3-mile ride may have actually fallen asleep after it pooped on me.




After returning to the farm, it was time for milking. Greg and Dave are the Jensens' evening milkers, and they're pretty good at what they do. Here's a look at milking sheep:




The Jensens are currently milking about 150 ewes, which takes just a little over an hour in their new double 10 Swedish parlor, a huge improvement over their home-made milking station they used the first five years they were on the farm.

After milking, we took a tour of the lambing facilities. The lambs start their lives in the nursery, born in straw pens, and then are moved to bigger pens as they age. On March 28, most of them will be sold at market - just in time for Easter dinner - and the Jensen farm will be a much quieter place.





The ewes still waiting to give birth, meanwhile, are so fat and fluffy that they look like caricature sheep - you know, the ones that came with your Little People Play Farm set? They're all wool, with short stick legs, kind of like this:



The Jensens' farm is absolutely breathtaking. Situated in the heart of Amish country, it's all hills, fences and pastures. Their morning milker is an amish neighbor, hence the buggy in the photo.



After morning milking, the evening's and morning's milk are combined, gravity fed into a stainless stell tank on wheels, and driven about 40 feet to the farm's creamery, where it is again gravity-fed into the farm's cheese plant, where Brenda makes cheese about four days a week. Here's a glimpse at the milk transportation process:










We didn't stick around to make cheese with Brenda in the morning - I've made cheese with her a couple of times before, once with my daughter, so we said goodbye to the Jensens and rolled down the driveway, although not without saying goodbye to the barn cats and Augustus Burdock Jensen, the farm dog.




Many, many thanks to Brenda and Dean for your hospitality, laughter and kindness in helping me celebrate the big 4-0! It couldn't have been any better.


Photos by Uriah Carpenter, copyright 2012.


2 comments:

cheesedude10 said...

Awesome shots! Can't wait to meet them! I'll be visiting their farm in early March. Hoping to introduce their cheeses to lots of chefs in St Louis!

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